SuperTips
Home > SuperTips > Legal Help > What Are Felony Classes?
Advertisers
Ogle, Elrod & Baril PLLC
Dependable SSI Lawyers. Call Our Law Firm 24/7 for an Appointment.
DisabilityLawyerOnline.com


Master Collection Professionals
No Collection: No Fee: Free Attorney Demand Letter: Call Now!
YourCollectionAttorney.com


Attorney Based Tax Problem Help
Attorney Backed Tax Service to Resolve Liens, Levies & Other Problems
BackTaxesHelp.com


Victory Tax Solutions Solves Tax Problems
The Victory Team Will Solve Your IRS & State Tax Problems - Call Now!
VictoryTaxSolutions.com


Asset Protection Law Firm
Experienced Asset Protection Firm. Proven Methods. Free Consultation.
assetprotectionatty.com


SuperTips Categories

Share This:

What Are Felony Classes?

Legal
Advertisement:
The Hayes Firm
Workers Compensation, Medical Malpractice, Motorcycle-Auto Accident
dreamlegalteam.com/

A felony is a criminal offence for which a criminal can be sentenced to more than one year in a state or federal prison, pay certain fines, or both. A felony is far more severe than a misdemeanor, which is a lesser degree of crime, in part due to the fact that the possible prison sentence is one or more years. A criminal can be sentenced to death for committing a felony in states that impose the death penalty. Felonies are typically divided into several classes, labeled A through I or one through six and each class has its own sentencing guidelines. Felony classes can vary widely from state to state, as some states refer to them as A through I and others as one through six. Depending on the state in which a criminal is tried, penalties may lean toward either the minimum or maximum sentence.

For all classes of felonies, repeat offenders may have their terms increased by up to two years for prior misdemeanor convictions or up to six years if the criminal has previously been convicted of a felony.

Class A Felonies

A Class A felony is the worst type of crime and involves a first-degree intentional homicide or a felony murder, and the penalty for it is imprisonment for life.

Class B Felonies

Class B felonies involve crimes such as second-degree intentional homicide (manslaughter), first-degree reckless homicide, conspiracy, first-degree sexual assault, or kidnapping. The penalty for a Class B felony is imprisonment for up to 60 years.

Class C Felonies

Class C felonies include crimes such as felony drunk driving, second-degree sexual assault, kidnapping, arson, robbery, and vehicular homicide while intoxicated. The penalty for Class C felonies is a fine up to $100,000, imprisonment for up to 40 years, or both.

Class D Felonies

Class D felonies involve crimes like felony drunk driving, felony vehicular homicide, vehicular homicide while intoxicated, child enticement, and solicitation of a child. Penalties for these types of felonies include a fine up to $100,000, imprisonment up to 25 years, or both.

Class E Felonies

Class E felonies include crimes such as battery that does great bodily harm, burglary, and robbery. The penalty for Class E Felonies is a fine of up to $50,000, imprisonment for up to 15 years, or both.

Class F Felonies

Class F felonies include crimes such as failure to act to prevent the sexual assault of a child, sexual exploitation, burglary, stalking, and theft. The penalty for Class F Felonies is a fine of up to $25,000, imprisonment for up to 12 ½ years, or both.

Class G Felonies

Class G felonies include crimes such as negligent homicide, negligent vehicular homicide, embezzlement, and theft. The penalty for such crimes is a fine of up to $25,000, imprisonment for up to ten years, or both.

Class H Felonies

Class H felonies involve crimes such as embezzlement, battery that causes great bodily harm, false imprisonment, stalking, and theft. The penalty for Class H felonies is a fine of up to $10,000, imprisonment for up to six years, or both.

Class I Felonies

Class I felonies include crimes such as child pornography, embezzlement, battery that causes substantial harm, stalking, and theft. The penalty for such crimes is a fine of up to $10,000, imprisonment for up to three-and-a-half years, or both.

Felony classes vary from state to state and can include different sentencing structures. For specific information on felony classes for a specific state, it can be helpful to consult with an attorney.

Find local Legal Resources

: