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Washington Apple Commission

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2900 Euclid Ave, Wenatchee, WA 98801
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(509) 663-9600 Additional Contacts
 
History In the fertile valleys and plateaus of Americas far west, growers tend orchards that produce the worlds best apples. More than 175,000 acres of apple orchards are nestled in the eastern foothills of the picturesque Cascade Mountains at elevati...read more
History In the fertile valleys and plateaus of Americas far west, growers tend orchards that produce the worlds best apples. More than 175,000 acres of apple orchards are nestled in the eastern foothills of the picturesque Cascade Mountains at elevations from 500 to 3,000 feet above sea level. The orchards are irrigated with plentiful and cool mountain water. The area first became known to American pioneers at the turn of the 19th century and by 1826, early settlers had discovered that the areas rich lava-ash soil and plentiful sunshine created perfect conditions for growing apples. The arid climate also meant fewer insect and disease problems providing a smooth finish on the apples. Noting the health and vigor of apple trees planted along stream banks, pioneers developed irrigation systems and by 1889, commercial orchards were established. Most apple-growing districts in the State are still located along the banks of major rivers. The average size of an orchard is about 50 acres, but some cover as many as 3,000 acres and employ 300 or more workers year-round. An estimated 35,000 to 45,000 pickers are employed during the peak of harvest. Washington State growers successfully harvest a wide variety of apples including Red and Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Braeburn, Jonagold, Fuji, Gala and many others. Orchardists continually improve growing methods to produce apples that are crisper, juicier, more flavorful and keep better in storage. New high-density plantings bring orchards into production faster through the use of dwarf trees. These new plantings provide orchardists with a faster return on investment by allowing growers to respond more rapidly to the changing consumer demand for new varieties. The smaller trees improve harvest efficiency because labor is substantially reduced. Because each apple is picked by hand, smaller trees mean less ladder work saving growers time and money. About The Washington State Apple Advertising Commission was created by an act of the Washington State Legislature in 1937 at the request of the apple industry, making it one of the oldest and largest commodity commissions in the United States. Under statutory authority, the Commission collects a mandatory assessment levied against all fresh apple shipments. No revenues are received from apples diverted to apple processors for juice, sauce, etc. The assessment rate is established by a referendum of commercial apple growers in the state, and remains at the same level yearly until changed by growers. Since 1937, growers have increased the assessment 13 times from its original 1 cent per box to as high as 40 cents per 42-lb box. Then in 2003 a lawsuit restructured the Commission and at this time the assessment is 3.5 cents per box. The Commission has a 14-member board of directors, nine of whom are elected by the apple growers in specified districts and four of whom are elected by the apple shippers and marketers in specified districts. One is the Director of Agriculture. Each Commissioner is elected for a three-year term. The Commission is considered a governmental agency since it is state-mandated, yet is governed and totally funded by growers under the supervision of the Director of Agriculture who approves the budget and sits on the Board of Directors. The primary purpose of the Commission is advertising, promotion, education and market development for the Washington fresh apple crop. Currently no promotions are being implemented in the US, but are implemented in more than 30 countries overseas where Washington apples are sold.
 
 

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History In the fertile valleys and plateaus of Americas far west, growers tend orchards that produce the worlds best apples. More than 175,000 acres of apple orchards are nestled in the eastern foothills of the picturesque Cascade Mountains at elevations from 500 to 3,000 feet above sea level. The orchards are irrigated with plentiful and cool mountain water. The area first became known to American pioneers at the turn of the 19th century and by 1826, early settlers had discovered that the areas rich lava-ash soil and plentiful sunshine created perfect conditions for growing apples. The arid climate also meant fewer insect and disease problems providing a smooth finish on the apples. Noting the health and vigor of apple trees planted along stream banks, pioneers developed irrigation systems and by 1889, commercial orchards were established. Most apple-growing districts in the State are still located along the banks of major rivers. The average size of an orchard is about 50 acres, but some cover as many as 3,000 acres and employ 300 or more workers year-round. An estimated 35,000 to 45,000 pickers are employed during the peak of harvest. Washington State growers successfully harvest a wide variety of apples including Red and Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Braeburn, Jonagold, Fuji, Gala and many others. Orchardists continually improve growing methods to produce apples that are crisper, juicier, more flavorful and keep better in storage. New high-density plantings bring orchards into production faster through the use of dwarf trees. These new plantings provide orchardists with a faster return on investment by allowing growers to respond more rapidly to the changing consumer demand for new varieties. The smaller trees improve harvest efficiency because labor is substantially reduced. Because each apple is picked by hand, smaller trees mean less ladder work saving growers time and money. About The Washington State Apple Advertising Commission was created by an act of the Washington State Legislature in 1937 at the request of the apple industry, making it one of the oldest and largest commodity commissions in the United States. Under statutory authority, the Commission collects a mandatory assessment levied against all fresh apple shipments. No revenues are received from apples diverted to apple processors for juice, sauce, etc. The assessment rate is established by a referendum of commercial apple growers in the state, and remains at the same level yearly until changed by growers. Since 1937, growers have increased the assessment 13 times from its original 1 cent per box to as high as 40 cents per 42-lb box. Then in 2003 a lawsuit restructured the Commission and at this time the assessment is 3.5 cents per box. The Commission has a 14-member board of directors, nine of whom are elected by the apple growers in specified districts and four of whom are elected by the apple shippers and marketers in specified districts. One is the Director of Agriculture. Each Commissioner is elected for a three-year term. The Commission is considered a governmental agency since it is state-mandated, yet is governed and totally funded by growers under the supervision of the Director of Agriculture who approves the budget and sits on the Board of Directors. The primary purpose of the Commission is advertising, promotion, education and market development for the Washington fresh apple crop. Currently no promotions are being implemented in the US, but are implemented in more than 30 countries overseas where Washington apples are sold.