< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

Town Of Plymouth

Not Rated Not Rated

80 Main St, Terryville, CT 06786
http://www.plymouthct.us
(860) 585-4001 Additional Contacts
 
Incorporated in 1795, the Town of Plymouth owes its beginnings to the foresight of such manufacturers as Eli Terry, Seth Thomas and Silas Hoadley. The manufacture of clocks first gave Plymouth national recognition. Eventually Seth Thomas moved from Pl...read more
Incorporated in 1795, the Town of Plymouth owes its beginnings to the foresight of such manufacturers as Eli Terry, Seth Thomas and Silas Hoadley. The manufacture of clocks first gave Plymouth national recognition. Eventually Seth Thomas moved from Plymouth Center to Plymouth Hollow (now Thomaston) to continue the trade. Eli Terry, Jr. carried the Terry name eastward to (now) Terryville where clocks, and beginning in 1830 locks, were manufactured through harnessing the power of the Pequabuck River. The latter enterprise became known as the Eagle Lock Company, which enjoyed a worldwide reputation and employed some 1,800 persons at its peak. Plymouth Center, while never a manufacturing center, retains most of its small town colonial charm and many of the original homes of the Town's industrial entrepreneurs. On July 22, 1999, the Plymouth Center Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Expanded the following year, it now encompasses 136 acres of land and contains 126 historic assets such as buildings, sites, and objects. The focal point of the Plymouth Center Historic District, Plymouth Center Village, is the green upon which it was reported that Union troops drilled during the Civil War era and now stands the Plymouth Congregational Church which houses the only Eli Terry wooden works tower clock in the world (see photo). The Town has successfully retained its rural New England charm for generations of Plymouth families, and yet is accessible to the larger communities of Bristol, Waterbury and Torrington. With its three villages of Plymouth, Terryville and Pequabuck, the Town of Plymouth is the perfect place to locate a growing manufacturer, start an office practice or develop a neighborhood-oriented restaurant or retail business. In other words, Plymouth is business friendly, offers a favorable business climate, a skilled work force, excellent transportation and utility infrastructure, a quality education system, and best of all, caring people.
 
 

Business Details

Additional Information

  • Borough Offices, City, City Courts
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 

You Might Also Like

  • Clear Bankruptcy
  • Call today for an appointment
  • View Website
  • Total Attorneys - Bankruptcy
  • Call today for an appointment
  • View Website

Search Nearby

Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

Incorporated in 1795, the Town of Plymouth owes its beginnings to the foresight of such manufacturers as Eli Terry, Seth Thomas and Silas Hoadley. The manufacture of clocks first gave Plymouth national recognition. Eventually Seth Thomas moved from Plymouth Center to Plymouth Hollow (now Thomaston) to continue the trade. Eli Terry, Jr. carried the Terry name eastward to (now) Terryville where clocks, and beginning in 1830 locks, were manufactured through harnessing the power of the Pequabuck River. The latter enterprise became known as the Eagle Lock Company, which enjoyed a worldwide reputation and employed some 1,800 persons at its peak. Plymouth Center, while never a manufacturing center, retains most of its small town colonial charm and many of the original homes of the Town's industrial entrepreneurs. On July 22, 1999, the Plymouth Center Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Expanded the following year, it now encompasses 136 acres of land and contains 126 historic assets such as buildings, sites, and objects. The focal point of the Plymouth Center Historic District, Plymouth Center Village, is the green upon which it was reported that Union troops drilled during the Civil War era and now stands the Plymouth Congregational Church which houses the only Eli Terry wooden works tower clock in the world (see photo). The Town has successfully retained its rural New England charm for generations of Plymouth families, and yet is accessible to the larger communities of Bristol, Waterbury and Torrington. With its three villages of Plymouth, Terryville and Pequabuck, the Town of Plymouth is the perfect place to locate a growing manufacturer, start an office practice or develop a neighborhood-oriented restaurant or retail business. In other words, Plymouth is business friendly, offers a favorable business climate, a skilled work force, excellent transportation and utility infrastructure, a quality education system, and best of all, caring people.