< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

Halifax County High School

Not Rated Not Rated

310 High School Circle, South Boston, VA 24592
http://www.halifax.k12.va.us/school...
(434) 572-4977 Additional Contacts
 
Halifax County was formed on May 19, 1752 from Lunenburg County and named in honor of George Montague Dunk, Second Earl of Halifax. Located in the south-central portion of the state, the county is bounded by the Virginia counties of Pittsylvania, Meck...read more
Halifax County was formed on May 19, 1752 from Lunenburg County and named in honor of George Montague Dunk, Second Earl of Halifax. Located in the south-central portion of the state, the county is bounded by the Virginia counties of Pittsylvania, Mecklenburg, Campbell, and Charlotte and the North Carolina counties of Caswell, Person, and Granville. Pittsylvania, Franklin, Henry, Patrick, and a portion of Bedford counties were once a part of Halifax County. Although these areas became independent counties, Halifax County remains the fourth largest county in the state in area and has a population of approximately 37,000. There are five incorporated towns within the geographical boundaries of Halifax County. Within the 802 square miles of the county are the towns of Halifax, Clover, Virgilina, Scottsburg, and South Boston. Each of the towns elects its council, however, all are under the countys jurisdiction. The elected eight-member Board of Supervisors is the governing body of Halifax County. These board members serve four-year terms, and each represents one of the eight electoral districts of the county. A county administrator is employed to serve as clerk and chief administrative officer for the board. In 1953, eight Halifax County, Virginia, high schools and one South Boston high school consolidated to form the Halifax County High School. Earlier in 1948, the Halifax County Training School located in Halifax and Booker T. Washington of South Boston had united, this making Halifax County Training School the largest rural high school for black students in the Commonwealth during the 1950s. Some seventeen years later, the Halifax County Training School was renamed Mary M. Bethune High School in honor of the famous black American educator. When the divisions secondary schools were integrated in early 1970, the Halifax County High School was reorganized as the Halifax County Senior High School serving tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade pupils of all races. In July 1993, the school once again became Halifax County High School with the formation of Halifax County Middle School and the addition of the ninth grade to the high school. The present Halifax County High School plant is located on Route 129 outside the town limits of South Boston and was opened for students during the 1979-80 school year.
 
 

Business Details

Additional Information

  • High School, Preparatory School
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 
Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

Halifax County was formed on May 19, 1752 from Lunenburg County and named in honor of George Montague Dunk, Second Earl of Halifax. Located in the south-central portion of the state, the county is bounded by the Virginia counties of Pittsylvania, Mecklenburg, Campbell, and Charlotte and the North Carolina counties of Caswell, Person, and Granville. Pittsylvania, Franklin, Henry, Patrick, and a portion of Bedford counties were once a part of Halifax County. Although these areas became independent counties, Halifax County remains the fourth largest county in the state in area and has a population of approximately 37,000. There are five incorporated towns within the geographical boundaries of Halifax County. Within the 802 square miles of the county are the towns of Halifax, Clover, Virgilina, Scottsburg, and South Boston. Each of the towns elects its council, however, all are under the countys jurisdiction. The elected eight-member Board of Supervisors is the governing body of Halifax County. These board members serve four-year terms, and each represents one of the eight electoral districts of the county. A county administrator is employed to serve as clerk and chief administrative officer for the board. In 1953, eight Halifax County, Virginia, high schools and one South Boston high school consolidated to form the Halifax County High School. Earlier in 1948, the Halifax County Training School located in Halifax and Booker T. Washington of South Boston had united, this making Halifax County Training School the largest rural high school for black students in the Commonwealth during the 1950s. Some seventeen years later, the Halifax County Training School was renamed Mary M. Bethune High School in honor of the famous black American educator. When the divisions secondary schools were integrated in early 1970, the Halifax County High School was reorganized as the Halifax County Senior High School serving tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade pupils of all races. In July 1993, the school once again became Halifax County High School with the formation of Halifax County Middle School and the addition of the ninth grade to the high school. The present Halifax County High School plant is located on Route 129 outside the town limits of South Boston and was opened for students during the 1979-80 school year.