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Compton Lumber Co

Not Rated Not Rated

3847 1st Ave S, Seattle, WA 98134
www.comptonlbr.com
(206) 623-5010
 
Compton Lumber Company was founded in 1892 by Horace Frank Compton. Born in San Francisco, Horace was brought to the Pacific Northwest by his parents, Levi and Caroline, in the early 1870's. Levi was a superintendent for the Northern Pacific Railway C...read more
Compton Lumber Company was founded in 1892 by Horace Frank Compton. Born in San Francisco, Horace was brought to the Pacific Northwest by his parents, Levi and Caroline, in the early 1870's. Levi was a superintendent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company in charge of constructing a bridge on the Kalama to Tacoma rail line. Horace completed his education at Central School in Seattle. While working as a surveyor for the Northern Pacific Railway, Horace purchased several parcels of land that would later prove to be excellent investments. For a time in the late 1880's, Horace worked for David F. Denny, an original Seattle pioneer, at his company, the Western Lumber Mill. Horace performed various duties, including Secretary, gaining valuable business experience. In 1892, Seattle experienced a severe economic depression. Mr. Denny lost most of his money, along with the mill. It was during this pivotal year Horace started Compton Lumber Company. The business was established opposite the famous old "Red Depot" at the foot of Columbia Street, with a capital investment of $300.00. Outgrowing this dockside location within a few years, the business was moved to the old Seattle and International depot which was next to the turntable of the Madison Street cable. This intersection is now Madison Street and Western Avenue. While at this site, and during the next two locations, Horace used freight cars provided by the Seattle Electric Company to ship large quantities of material, via cable-car, to Madison Park and other areas on the other side of the hill. Local deliveries were accomplished with horse drawn lumber wagons. This is the inspiration for the company logo. In the early 1910's, Horace moved the business closer to the Farmers Market (today known as the Pike Place Market). That area of Seattle was becoming the center of activity. In 1923, Horace passed away leaving the management to his eldest son, Frank Allison Compton. Continued growth demanded more space. Frank A. purchased a triangular lot just North of the Market which became known as 2109 Western Avenue. Today, a restaurant, parking garage and office complex are occupying the 2109 location. The company continued under the guidance of Frank A. until his passing in 1943 at which time his eldest son, Frank Horace Compton took over. In 1950, with the construction of the Alaska Way Viaduct, the business was again forced to move due to lack of space. A four story warehouse was available just 4 blocks to the North and this location, 2315 Western Avenue, became the home for Compton Lumber for 36 years. In 1959, Frank H. died after a sudden illness. This left the company in the hands of Franks younger brother Robert O. (Bob) Compton. In 1986 Bob was responsible for moving the business to its present location, 3847 First Avenue South in Seattle. Bob was at the helm of Compton Lumber for 35 years. His tenure extended to 47 years and ended on December 31, 1994 upon his retirement. He, and his wife Pat, enjoyed their retirement by residing in the Seattle area during the Summer, and in Sun City West, Arizona, during the winter. Bob succumbed to complications following bypass heart surgery on December 6, 2001. (Obituary) Upon Bobs retirement, Frank H. Comptons son, John Frank Compton, took over to lead the company into the 21st Century. The family tradition continues. Bobs eldest son, Steve, works alongside John assisting him in the daily activities of the business. Johns son, Greg is presently on the payroll representing the fifth generation. In it's 118th year, Compton Lumber Company continues to maintain its strong philosophy on quality merchandise, service that is second to none, fair pricing, and strict attention to detail. Some of the existing customers have been patrons extending back into the early 1900's as a testimony to this philosophy. It is a well earned source of pride for the Compton Family to have kept the business "in the family" all of these years.
 
 

Business Details

Categories

(Edit)
Commercial & Industrial Building Materials & Supplies, Door & Door Frame Dealers, Doors & Door Frames Commercial & Industrial, Hardwood, Lumber Dealers

Hours of Operation

(Edit)
  • Mon 06:30 AM-04:30 PM
  • Tue 06:30 AM-04:30 PM
  • Fri 06:30 AM-04:30 PM

Additional Information

  • So...you want to buy from a "Green" Lumber Yard? Here are some statistics for Compton Lumber: Lumber Scrap Recycled: over 140 tons since 2004 Recycling Office Paper: Since 1990 FSC Certified : Since... More So...you want to buy from a "Green" Lumber Yard? Here are some statistics for Compton Lumber: Lumber Scrap Recycled: over 140 tons since 2004 Recycling Office Paper: Since 1990 FSC Certified : Since 2004 Recycled Products: Homasote - Ramboard 2003: Complete office lighting change over to lower wattage bulbs and electronic ballasts As you can see, Compton Lumber has been at the fore-front of the recycle curve, selling lumber from responsibly managed forests, and stocking environmentally friendly products. While many businesses want you to believe they are "green", we just do itLess

In Business Since

  • 1892

Customers Served

  • Residential, Commercial, Industrial

Ownership

  • Family Owned

Products & Services

(Edit)
  • Ash
  • Basswood
  • Birch
  • Cedar
  • Cellar Doors
  • More
  • Custom Work
  • Cutting Services
  • Decking
  • Decorating Assistance
  • design
  • Door Hardware
  • Door Hinges
  • Doors
  • Equipment Rental
  • Exterior Doors
  • Fences
  • Fir
  • Fire Doors
  • Flooring
  • French Doors
  • Glass Doors
  • Hardware
  • Hardwood
  • Hardwoods
  • Hickory
  • Installation
  • Insulation
  • Interior Doors
  • Lumber
  • Mahogany
  • Maple
  • Melamine
  • Metal Studs
  • Millwork
  • Mirrored Doors
  • Oak
  • Paneling
  • Particle Board
  • Pine
  • Plaster
  • Plywood
  • Poplar
  • Pre-hung Doors
  • Projects Sites
  • Pvc & Plastic Pipe
  • Railings
  • Recycled Lumber
  • Redwood
  • Repairs
  • Rosewood
  • Rough Cut Lumber
  • Sand
  • Screen Doors
  • Security Doors
  • Siding
  • Staining
  • Stains
  • Steel Doors
  • Studs
  • Teak
  • Timbers
  • Tools
  • Used Doors
  • Wallboard
  • Walnut
  • Wood Veneers
  • Zebrawood
  • Less

Specialties

(Edit)
  • So...you want to buy from a

Payment Options

(Edit)
  • American Express
  • VISA

Certification & Affiliations

  • The entrepreneurial spirit continues to grow within the existing family members, much as it did in the late 1800's with Horace. The prospect for continued success is guaranteed well into the Twenty- First Century.

Areas Served

  • My Metro Area
 

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Compton Lumber Company was founded in 1892 by Horace Frank Compton. Born in San Francisco, Horace was brought to the Pacific Northwest by his parents, Levi and Caroline, in the early 1870's. Levi was a superintendent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company in charge of constructing a bridge on the Kalama to Tacoma rail line. Horace completed his education at Central School in Seattle. While working as a surveyor for the Northern Pacific Railway, Horace purchased several parcels of land that would later prove to be excellent investments. For a time in the late 1880's, Horace worked for David F. Denny, an original Seattle pioneer, at his company, the Western Lumber Mill. Horace performed various duties, including Secretary, gaining valuable business experience. In 1892, Seattle experienced a severe economic depression. Mr. Denny lost most of his money, along with the mill. It was during this pivotal year Horace started Compton Lumber Company. The business was established opposite the famous old "Red Depot" at the foot of Columbia Street, with a capital investment of $300.00. Outgrowing this dockside location within a few years, the business was moved to the old Seattle and International depot which was next to the turntable of the Madison Street cable. This intersection is now Madison Street and Western Avenue. While at this site, and during the next two locations, Horace used freight cars provided by the Seattle Electric Company to ship large quantities of material, via cable-car, to Madison Park and other areas on the other side of the hill. Local deliveries were accomplished with horse drawn lumber wagons. This is the inspiration for the company logo. In the early 1910's, Horace moved the business closer to the Farmers Market (today known as the Pike Place Market). That area of Seattle was becoming the center of activity. In 1923, Horace passed away leaving the management to his eldest son, Frank Allison Compton. Continued growth demanded more space. Frank A. purchased a triangular lot just North of the Market which became known as 2109 Western Avenue. Today, a restaurant, parking garage and office complex are occupying the 2109 location. The company continued under the guidance of Frank A. until his passing in 1943 at which time his eldest son, Frank Horace Compton took over. In 1950, with the construction of the Alaska Way Viaduct, the business was again forced to move due to lack of space. A four story warehouse was available just 4 blocks to the North and this location, 2315 Western Avenue, became the home for Compton Lumber for 36 years. In 1959, Frank H. died after a sudden illness. This left the company in the hands of Franks younger brother Robert O. (Bob) Compton. In 1986 Bob was responsible for moving the business to its present location, 3847 First Avenue South in Seattle. Bob was at the helm of Compton Lumber for 35 years. His tenure extended to 47 years and ended on December 31, 1994 upon his retirement. He, and his wife Pat, enjoyed their retirement by residing in the Seattle area during the Summer, and in Sun City West, Arizona, during the winter. Bob succumbed to complications following bypass heart surgery on December 6, 2001. (Obituary) Upon Bobs retirement, Frank H. Comptons son, John Frank Compton, took over to lead the company into the 21st Century. The family tradition continues. Bobs eldest son, Steve, works alongside John assisting him in the daily activities of the business. Johns son, Greg is presently on the payroll representing the fifth generation. In it's 118th year, Compton Lumber Company continues to maintain its strong philosophy on quality merchandise, service that is second to none, fair pricing, and strict attention to detail. Some of the existing customers have been patrons extending back into the early 1900's as a testimony to this philosophy. It is a well earned source of pride for the Compton Family to have kept the business "in the family" all of these years.