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Village Of Montpelier

2 of 5 stars 1 Reviews

211 N Jonesville St, Montpelier, OH 43543
http://www.montpelieroh.net
(419) 485-5543 Additional Contacts
 
History: The Village of Montpelier has a rich heritage stretching back more than 150 years to its beginnings as a frontier mill site and county seat contender, through its rebirth as a railroad boomtown, and finally its transition to a growing 21st Ce...read more
History: The Village of Montpelier has a rich heritage stretching back more than 150 years to its beginnings as a frontier mill site and county seat contender, through its rebirth as a railroad boomtown, and finally its transition to a growing 21st Century community with a more diverse economy. By 1845, John K. Bryner and Jesse Tucker built a water-powered mill in Section 2 of Superior Township at a bend in the St. Joseph River. On May 25, 1845, Bryner and Tucker had the village of Montpelier, consisting of 41 lots and a public square, surveyed just south of their mill. Little is known about Tucker and Bryner. John Brynerbs grave has a Mexican War veteranbs marker on it, indicating he left the area soon after the platting of Montpelier to serve in this late 1840s conflict. Following the war, in 1849, Bryner purchased 115.15 acres on the east side of Montpelier, which is now the location of the Williams County fairgrounds. The 1850 and 1860 Williams County censuses do not list Mr. Bryner. In 1863, his wife Lucynda died and she was buried in Montpelierbs Louden Cemetery, indicating he may have returned to the area around this time. Bryner appears in the 1870 Williams County census as a Pennsylvania native, a farmer by trade, and his age appears to be 63. John Bryner died March 6, 1871, and was buried next to his wife. Local tradition holds that the surveyor Tucker and Bryner hired to lay out their new town walked from Williams Center to Pulaski, a distance of about eight miles, where Dr. John Paul offered him a ride to the proposed town site. In return for this favor, the surveyor allowed Dr. Paul to name the fledgling village bMontpelierb after the capital of his native state, Vermont. According to the original plat filed in the Williams County recorderbs office, Thomas Ogle performed the surveying work, and the plat was certified by Seth B. Hyatt, county surveyor pro tem. Why did Tucker and Bryner select this location for their new town? Several possibilities exist. Prior to 1845, Williams County contained two additional rows of townships, making the countybs border about 12 miles further south than today. At that time, Bryan, the county seat, was near Williams Countybs geographical center. On March 4, 1845, Defiance County was created, removing the two southernmost rows of townships from Williams County. This placed Bryner and Tuckerbs mill near the geographical center of the new, smaller Williams County, and left Bryan about three miles from the countybs south boundary. This turn of events suddenly made their mill site a desirable location for a new town and a good candidate for the county seat. By 1846, two stores were doing business in Montpelier, and a gristmill and an ashery were constructed about the time the town was surveyed. In December 1846, the Eagle Creek post office, which had been established August 30, 1843, at Robert Oglebs farm northwest of town, was moved into Conroy Mallorybs store in the village and renamed Montpelier. In 1850, Montpelier made its first bid to wrestle the county seat from Bryan. Being near Williams Countybs geographical center, Montpelier presented a shorter distance for many local residents in the days of difficult travel by horse power or on foot over dirt roads that were impassable much of the year. The Montpelieritesb logical plea to relocate the county seat failed to convince the Ohio Legislature, however, and similar attempts in 1853 and 1857 produced similar results. The bcounty seat warb between Montpelier and Bryan continued to smolder until 1888 when construction of the existing Williams County courthouse in Bryan finally put the debate to rest. An 1853 newspaper account states, bMontpelier is a thriving little village with three stores, two groceries, one tavern, one fine gristmill, a (wool) carding machine and various mechanics. We have but little idea of the population, but suppose it to be about 200.b Shown on an 1864 map of Montpelier are
 
 

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2 of 5 stars
Jun 22, 2010
business
Village Of Montpelier 211 N Jonesville St,
Montpelier, OH 43543
USA
Very unethical practices. Horrible customer service at best. Employees are rude. Very stingy on giving a one day extension to pay your bill. Donald M.
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History: The Village of Montpelier has a rich heritage stretching back more than 150 years to its beginnings as a frontier mill site and county seat contender, through its rebirth as a railroad boomtown, and finally its transition to a growing 21st Century community with a more diverse economy. By 1845, John K. Bryner and Jesse Tucker built a water-powered mill in Section 2 of Superior Township at a bend in the St. Joseph River. On May 25, 1845, Bryner and Tucker had the village of Montpelier, consisting of 41 lots and a public square, surveyed just south of their mill. Little is known about Tucker and Bryner. John Brynerbs grave has a Mexican War veteranbs marker on it, indicating he left the area soon after the platting of Montpelier to serve in this late 1840s conflict. Following the war, in 1849, Bryner purchased 115.15 acres on the east side of Montpelier, which is now the location of the Williams County fairgrounds. The 1850 and 1860 Williams County censuses do not list Mr. Bryner. In 1863, his wife Lucynda died and she was buried in Montpelierbs Louden Cemetery, indicating he may have returned to the area around this time. Bryner appears in the 1870 Williams County census as a Pennsylvania native, a farmer by trade, and his age appears to be 63. John Bryner died March 6, 1871, and was buried next to his wife. Local tradition holds that the surveyor Tucker and Bryner hired to lay out their new town walked from Williams Center to Pulaski, a distance of about eight miles, where Dr. John Paul offered him a ride to the proposed town site. In return for this favor, the surveyor allowed Dr. Paul to name the fledgling village bMontpelierb after the capital of his native state, Vermont. According to the original plat filed in the Williams County recorderbs office, Thomas Ogle performed the surveying work, and the plat was certified by Seth B. Hyatt, county surveyor pro tem. Why did Tucker and Bryner select this location for their new town? Several possibilities exist. Prior to 1845, Williams County contained two additional rows of townships, making the countybs border about 12 miles further south than today. At that time, Bryan, the county seat, was near Williams Countybs geographical center. On March 4, 1845, Defiance County was created, removing the two southernmost rows of townships from Williams County. This placed Bryner and Tuckerbs mill near the geographical center of the new, smaller Williams County, and left Bryan about three miles from the countybs south boundary. This turn of events suddenly made their mill site a desirable location for a new town and a good candidate for the county seat. By 1846, two stores were doing business in Montpelier, and a gristmill and an ashery were constructed about the time the town was surveyed. In December 1846, the Eagle Creek post office, which had been established August 30, 1843, at Robert Oglebs farm northwest of town, was moved into Conroy Mallorybs store in the village and renamed Montpelier. In 1850, Montpelier made its first bid to wrestle the county seat from Bryan. Being near Williams Countybs geographical center, Montpelier presented a shorter distance for many local residents in the days of difficult travel by horse power or on foot over dirt roads that were impassable much of the year. The Montpelieritesb logical plea to relocate the county seat failed to convince the Ohio Legislature, however, and similar attempts in 1853 and 1857 produced similar results. The bcounty seat warb between Montpelier and Bryan continued to smolder until 1888 when construction of the existing Williams County courthouse in Bryan finally put the debate to rest. An 1853 newspaper account states, bMontpelier is a thriving little village with three stores, two groceries, one tavern, one fine gristmill, a (wool) carding machine and various mechanics. We have but little idea of the population, but suppose it to be about 200.b Shown on an 1864 map of Montpelier are