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Knight Elementary School

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401 N River Dr SW, Lilburn, GA 30047
http://gwinnett.k12.ga.us/KnightES/...
(770) 921-2400
 
Knight Elementary School was named to honor Victor H. Knight, a Gwinnett County educator who taught at Carters Academy, Harbins, Five Forks and Bethesda Schools. He served as principal of Dacula High School for 14 years, then at South Gwinnett High Sc...read more
Knight Elementary School was named to honor Victor H. Knight, a Gwinnett County educator who taught at Carters Academy, Harbins, Five Forks and Bethesda Schools. He served as principal of Dacula High School for 14 years, then at South Gwinnett High School from 1957 until his death in October of 1964. His daughter, Leslie Jo Bentley, was the Assistant Superintendent of Instruction for the Gwinnett County Public Schools for over 10 years and was its Director of Pupil Personnel Services until 1987.The school was planned and built during a period of very rapid population growth in the Lilburn-Five Forks area. It was comprised of grades kindergarten through six at first but was changed to K-Five in subsequent years. The school, planned for a population of 800, had 32 classrooms along two halls and two courtyards which could be used for outdoor activities. The student population grew rapidly, reaching its largest enrollment of 1,100 within three years. After that peak, the population began to decline until Knight was one of the smallest schools in Gwinnett County. As the County population began to surge in other areas, Knights attendance zone was changed twice. With the second change in 1999-2000 came increasing diversity and a lower socio-economic status. When the school became a Targeted Assistance Title I School in FY 2003, the entire community was determined to maintain the high standards and expectations which had become the reputation of Knight Elementary School. Knight Elementary School has had three principals. The schools first principal, Martha Brady, chose the school colors of red and white, selected the logo Knights Dynamite and set the tone for excellence in education. Her use of committees in decision-making led to a shared leadership philosophy which spread throughout the county. Shirley Davis-Chapman, Knights second principal, continued the focus on excellence for one year, then she transferred to a new elementary school within the county.Burrelle S. Meeks, Knights third and present principal, brought a new and vibrant approach to learning. Her knowledge of the developmental stages of children brought about the awareness of each childs uniqueness. Dr. Meeks believes in a holistic approach to teaching and children learning through life experiences. She was the driving force for achieving the recognition of Georgia School of Excellence in 1987 and National School of Excellence in 1988. In 1990, Knights teachers were recognized by the Georgia Teachers of English with an Excellence in English award. In 1996, Knight Town, a dynamic school wide micro society, was given the Economic Program of Excellence Award by the Georgia Council on Economic Education and in 1997 was recognized as Outstanding Elementary Program of the Year by the Georgia Association for Social Studies. In 2005, when classroom teachers and students partnered with the GCPS Bus Managers, Knight earned anational recognition, KC3 Citizenship in Motion Award. During that same year, Knight was recognized with the Georgia 2005 GOLD AWARD by having 97% of the children in grades 1-5 pass all sections of the Georgia Criterion Referenced CompetencyTests. During its 28 year history, Knight had six instructional lead teachers: Maxine Rithmire, Connie Karras, Yvonne Fincher, Judy Jefferson, Barbara Lunsford and Susan Clymer, as well as, five assistant principals: Sue Holt, Lita Barnette, Jackie Campbell, Eileen Sasso, and Marilyn Carey ,who presently guides the teaching and learning for staff, for students and for their parents. Knight is also fortunate to have had excellent counselors. Bobbie Ott, then Mary Flynt and Sharon Wilson opened the doors for the present elementary counseling program, which is currently led by Diane LaCharite. The STAR (Students Taking Awesome Responsibility) Discipline Program has been recognized throughout the State of Georgia and led the way for eliminating corporal punishment in public schools.The Media Center at Knight has been the centra
 
 

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Knight Elementary School was named to honor Victor H. Knight, a Gwinnett County educator who taught at Carters Academy, Harbins, Five Forks and Bethesda Schools. He served as principal of Dacula High School for 14 years, then at South Gwinnett High School from 1957 until his death in October of 1964. His daughter, Leslie Jo Bentley, was the Assistant Superintendent of Instruction for the Gwinnett County Public Schools for over 10 years and was its Director of Pupil Personnel Services until 1987.The school was planned and built during a period of very rapid population growth in the Lilburn-Five Forks area. It was comprised of grades kindergarten through six at first but was changed to K-Five in subsequent years. The school, planned for a population of 800, had 32 classrooms along two halls and two courtyards which could be used for outdoor activities. The student population grew rapidly, reaching its largest enrollment of 1,100 within three years. After that peak, the population began to decline until Knight was one of the smallest schools in Gwinnett County. As the County population began to surge in other areas, Knights attendance zone was changed twice. With the second change in 1999-2000 came increasing diversity and a lower socio-economic status. When the school became a Targeted Assistance Title I School in FY 2003, the entire community was determined to maintain the high standards and expectations which had become the reputation of Knight Elementary School. Knight Elementary School has had three principals. The schools first principal, Martha Brady, chose the school colors of red and white, selected the logo Knights Dynamite and set the tone for excellence in education. Her use of committees in decision-making led to a shared leadership philosophy which spread throughout the county. Shirley Davis-Chapman, Knights second principal, continued the focus on excellence for one year, then she transferred to a new elementary school within the county.Burrelle S. Meeks, Knights third and present principal, brought a new and vibrant approach to learning. Her knowledge of the developmental stages of children brought about the awareness of each childs uniqueness. Dr. Meeks believes in a holistic approach to teaching and children learning through life experiences. She was the driving force for achieving the recognition of Georgia School of Excellence in 1987 and National School of Excellence in 1988. In 1990, Knights teachers were recognized by the Georgia Teachers of English with an Excellence in English award. In 1996, Knight Town, a dynamic school wide micro society, was given the Economic Program of Excellence Award by the Georgia Council on Economic Education and in 1997 was recognized as Outstanding Elementary Program of the Year by the Georgia Association for Social Studies. In 2005, when classroom teachers and students partnered with the GCPS Bus Managers, Knight earned anational recognition, KC3 Citizenship in Motion Award. During that same year, Knight was recognized with the Georgia 2005 GOLD AWARD by having 97% of the children in grades 1-5 pass all sections of the Georgia Criterion Referenced CompetencyTests. During its 28 year history, Knight had six instructional lead teachers: Maxine Rithmire, Connie Karras, Yvonne Fincher, Judy Jefferson, Barbara Lunsford and Susan Clymer, as well as, five assistant principals: Sue Holt, Lita Barnette, Jackie Campbell, Eileen Sasso, and Marilyn Carey ,who presently guides the teaching and learning for staff, for students and for their parents. Knight is also fortunate to have had excellent counselors. Bobbie Ott, then Mary Flynt and Sharon Wilson opened the doors for the present elementary counseling program, which is currently led by Diane LaCharite. The STAR (Students Taking Awesome Responsibility) Discipline Program has been recognized throughout the State of Georgia and led the way for eliminating corporal punishment in public schools.The Media Center at Knight has been the centra