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Wayne County School System

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555 Sunset Blvd, Jesup, GA 31545
http://www.wayne.k12.ga.us
(912) 427-1000 Additional Contacts
 
History: The first recorded school in Wayne County was Waynesville Academy, located in Old Waynesville. According to the late Judge D. M. Clark, the first school in Jesup was in the unfinished Methodist church building on the corner of E. Cherry and N...read more
History: The first recorded school in Wayne County was Waynesville Academy, located in Old Waynesville. According to the late Judge D. M. Clark, the first school in Jesup was in the unfinished Methodist church building on the corner of E. Cherry and N. Brunswick streets. Judge Clark wrote: "Father moved his family to Jesup in February of 1873, at which time the Methodist church was incomplete, but was occupied for services and also a day school. There was no school building, or any other building used for school purposes other than the church building." The second documented school was taught by Miss Belle Norwood in 1876-77 "while her father was manager of the railroad hotel" (said to have been a large hotel near the railroad station). Miss Norwood was a graduate of Savannah High School. Presumably the school was taught in the hotel. According to Anna K. Clark, her niece, Belle Norwood later taught another private school, this time in the original Milikin School House for several years. This school stood at the corner of Bay Street and South First Street. Among the pupils were some of the Milikins, the Hopps, the Goodbreads, the Whaleys daughter, Frances Grady, the Causey's, the Purdoms, and others. When Miss Fannie Milikin graduated from Shorter College in 1888, she and three classmates founded the Milikin School for Girls. The founding date has also been given as 1890. Fannie Milikin was a daughter of Benjamin D. Milikin and Martha Hopps Milikin and later married Joe H. Thomas. "Fannie Miliken, 20, was quite an accomplished young woman. (She had at one time been associated with her father in publishing the then-young "Jesup Sentinel.") She was interested in education for girls and persuaded her friends, Jennie Killen, Laura Hume, and Betty Ledbetter, to assist her in establishing a school for the young girls of Jesup." To house this school, the Milikin School House was greatly enlarged and improved. This proved to be an excellent and popular school and included Latin and German in its curriculum. Some forty to fifty young girls attended the Milikin Girls School during its five-year life span, their parents paying tuition for their instruction. The building was moved in more recent years to a site in the Toddville Community four miles southeast of Jesup off U. S. Highway 84 where moderate alterations were made in the structure. According to Anna K. Clark, a Captain Fort taught a school for boys about the same time. This may have been Jesup Academy, first established in the Masonic Building in 1888. This school proudly promised to prepare boys for West Point and Annapolis. (The school was sometimes referred to as Jesup Institute). Tuition rates for that year were $1.50 to $4 per month. In the Aug. 2, 1888 edition of The Jesup Sentinel, the Odum correspondent reported that three schools were in operation in that community. One was at Beulah, near the G. W. Harris home, and one at Bethel church. Private school was being conducted by Miss Amanda Moody at the Aaron Moody Home. Several schools sprang up in other parts of the county before the turn of the century. The old Sawgrass School was located near the Wayne and Brantley line, three miles from Hortense and 2.5 miles east of present U. S. Highway 301. Dale's Mill, a thriving community just north of Screven on the railroad, had its own school. Ellis Creek Old School, standing on Ellis Creek on the old Fort Barrington Ferry Road was located across the road from the Union Baptist Church. Church records state: "Families would send their children there if a place could be found to board them. In later years, the school turned out doctors, teachers, lawyers and businessmen." The public school system was organized probably in 1894 (Dates from 1890 to 1896 have also been mentioned.). The city of Jesup had began to realize the need for a city school. The town was growing and there was promise of much development for Jesup. It was at this time that the Georgia Normal Industrial School w
 
 

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History: The first recorded school in Wayne County was Waynesville Academy, located in Old Waynesville. According to the late Judge D. M. Clark, the first school in Jesup was in the unfinished Methodist church building on the corner of E. Cherry and N. Brunswick streets. Judge Clark wrote: "Father moved his family to Jesup in February of 1873, at which time the Methodist church was incomplete, but was occupied for services and also a day school. There was no school building, or any other building used for school purposes other than the church building." The second documented school was taught by Miss Belle Norwood in 1876-77 "while her father was manager of the railroad hotel" (said to have been a large hotel near the railroad station). Miss Norwood was a graduate of Savannah High School. Presumably the school was taught in the hotel. According to Anna K. Clark, her niece, Belle Norwood later taught another private school, this time in the original Milikin School House for several years. This school stood at the corner of Bay Street and South First Street. Among the pupils were some of the Milikins, the Hopps, the Goodbreads, the Whaleys daughter, Frances Grady, the Causey's, the Purdoms, and others. When Miss Fannie Milikin graduated from Shorter College in 1888, she and three classmates founded the Milikin School for Girls. The founding date has also been given as 1890. Fannie Milikin was a daughter of Benjamin D. Milikin and Martha Hopps Milikin and later married Joe H. Thomas. "Fannie Miliken, 20, was quite an accomplished young woman. (She had at one time been associated with her father in publishing the then-young "Jesup Sentinel.") She was interested in education for girls and persuaded her friends, Jennie Killen, Laura Hume, and Betty Ledbetter, to assist her in establishing a school for the young girls of Jesup." To house this school, the Milikin School House was greatly enlarged and improved. This proved to be an excellent and popular school and included Latin and German in its curriculum. Some forty to fifty young girls attended the Milikin Girls School during its five-year life span, their parents paying tuition for their instruction. The building was moved in more recent years to a site in the Toddville Community four miles southeast of Jesup off U. S. Highway 84 where moderate alterations were made in the structure. According to Anna K. Clark, a Captain Fort taught a school for boys about the same time. This may have been Jesup Academy, first established in the Masonic Building in 1888. This school proudly promised to prepare boys for West Point and Annapolis. (The school was sometimes referred to as Jesup Institute). Tuition rates for that year were $1.50 to $4 per month. In the Aug. 2, 1888 edition of The Jesup Sentinel, the Odum correspondent reported that three schools were in operation in that community. One was at Beulah, near the G. W. Harris home, and one at Bethel church. Private school was being conducted by Miss Amanda Moody at the Aaron Moody Home. Several schools sprang up in other parts of the county before the turn of the century. The old Sawgrass School was located near the Wayne and Brantley line, three miles from Hortense and 2.5 miles east of present U. S. Highway 301. Dale's Mill, a thriving community just north of Screven on the railroad, had its own school. Ellis Creek Old School, standing on Ellis Creek on the old Fort Barrington Ferry Road was located across the road from the Union Baptist Church. Church records state: "Families would send their children there if a place could be found to board them. In later years, the school turned out doctors, teachers, lawyers and businessmen." The public school system was organized probably in 1894 (Dates from 1890 to 1896 have also been mentioned.). The city of Jesup had began to realize the need for a city school. The town was growing and there was promise of much development for Jesup. It was at this time that the Georgia Normal Industrial School w