< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

City Of Imperial Beach

Not Rated Not Rated

825 Imperial Beach Blvd, Imperial Beach, CA 91932
http://www.cityofib.com
Email this business
(619) 628-1365 Additional Contacts
 
Mission Statement: To maintain and enhance Imperial Beach as "Classic Southern California", a beach-oriented community with a safe, small town, family atmosphere, rich in natural and cultural resources. History: The "modern" history of Imperial Beach...read more
Mission Statement: To maintain and enhance Imperial Beach as "Classic Southern California", a beach-oriented community with a safe, small town, family atmosphere, rich in natural and cultural resources. History: The "modern" history of Imperial Beach started about June 1887 when R. R. Morrison a real estate developer, filed a subdivision map with the San Diego County Clerk. The map referred to the area as South San Diego Beach, The area It encompassed was 5th Street to 13th Street north of Palm Avenue and from about 9th Street to 17th Street between Palm Avenue and (what today is) Imperial Beach Blvd. This included areas that have since been annexed by San Diego and which were formerly called Palm City. Mr. George Chaffey purchased several plots of land for subdivision. His intent was to create a summer retreat for the people of Imperial Valley. It's considered that the name 'Imperial Beach" was coined as part of a marketing strategy. Mr. Frank J. Cullen, another sub-divider, did some building on 1st street. Some of his structures lasted until 1963 when they were razed to provide space for the Municipal Pier parking lot. The 1880's came to be known as the land boom era, Promoters followed the same general pattern. First came acquisition and subdivision which was followed by a hotel or other attraction. Then came the land auction and finally the hardest part, the building of the community by its residents. In the years preceding and following, this same general pattern held true for many of the developments in the surrounding area, such as Coronado Heights, Oneonta, Monument City, South San Diego, International City, Barbers Station, South Coronado, Tia Juana City and San Ysidro. Imperial Beach got its first sidewalks in 1909-1910. The Disinger's operated a general store, post office and a branch of the county library on First Street for nearly fifty years. Down the street a few blocks, Mrs. Harmon built a dance pavilion with an adjoining cafe. It reached its peak of popularity during World War I and operated until it burned down on Christmas Day, 1943, when its cooking tanks exploded. The roof on the home of Harold and Genevieve Ord caught fire from drifting cinders. Ord was away from home, fighting the Cafe-Pavilion fire. A pier was constructed about 1909. Its original purpose was to generate electricity for the town using wave action which activated massive machinery on the end of the pier. It worked inadequately for its intended purpose and the "Edwards Wave Motor," as it was named, was disassembled and removed. For many years the pier attracted large crowds as did the nearby boardwalk and bathhouse. The wooden pier finally deteriorated and it washed to sea in a severe 1948 storm. The boardwalk lasted until 1953. Also in 1910, the builder of the Hotel del Coronado, E. S. Babcock, who reportedly kept a mistress in Imperial Beach, dredged a channel to where the north end of 10th Street is today. Boats carrying up to fifty passengers landed at what was called the South San Diego Landing. The boats were operated by Oakley Hall and Ralph Chandler. Captain A. J. Larsen piloted the Grant, which had been purchased from the USS Grant hotel by Chandler. The Grant traveled between Market Street in San Diego to the South Bay Landing three times a day. Sometimes a night trip was added. A battery powered trolley car operated by the Mexico and San Diego Railway Company met the people at the South Bay Landing. The trolley took them up 10th Street to Palm Ave. and then west on Palm to First Street where it turned left and proceeded to the end of the street before returning to the landing. The motor cars' batteries were the newest invention of Thomas A. Edison who had experimented with a way to do away with the overhead trolley car wires. The cruises were very popular for about six years. In January 1916, after very heavy rains, the the Sweetwater Dam suffered severe erosion, and the Lower Otay Dam was totally destroyed. A large wall of water
 
 

Business Details

Additional Information

  • County, County Courts, Local
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 

You Might Also Like

  • Clear Bankruptcy
  • Call today for an appointment
  • View Website
  • Bender & Gritz
  • Need a Local Lawyer? Call Now for Fast, Quality Service.
  • View Website
  • Martinez & Schill LLP
  • Need a Local Lawyer? Call Now for Fast, Quality Service.
  • View Website

Search Nearby

Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

Mission Statement: To maintain and enhance Imperial Beach as "Classic Southern California", a beach-oriented community with a safe, small town, family atmosphere, rich in natural and cultural resources. History: The "modern" history of Imperial Beach started about June 1887 when R. R. Morrison a real estate developer, filed a subdivision map with the San Diego County Clerk. The map referred to the area as South San Diego Beach, The area It encompassed was 5th Street to 13th Street north of Palm Avenue and from about 9th Street to 17th Street between Palm Avenue and (what today is) Imperial Beach Blvd. This included areas that have since been annexed by San Diego and which were formerly called Palm City. Mr. George Chaffey purchased several plots of land for subdivision. His intent was to create a summer retreat for the people of Imperial Valley. It's considered that the name 'Imperial Beach" was coined as part of a marketing strategy. Mr. Frank J. Cullen, another sub-divider, did some building on 1st street. Some of his structures lasted until 1963 when they were razed to provide space for the Municipal Pier parking lot. The 1880's came to be known as the land boom era, Promoters followed the same general pattern. First came acquisition and subdivision which was followed by a hotel or other attraction. Then came the land auction and finally the hardest part, the building of the community by its residents. In the years preceding and following, this same general pattern held true for many of the developments in the surrounding area, such as Coronado Heights, Oneonta, Monument City, South San Diego, International City, Barbers Station, South Coronado, Tia Juana City and San Ysidro. Imperial Beach got its first sidewalks in 1909-1910. The Disinger's operated a general store, post office and a branch of the county library on First Street for nearly fifty years. Down the street a few blocks, Mrs. Harmon built a dance pavilion with an adjoining cafe. It reached its peak of popularity during World War I and operated until it burned down on Christmas Day, 1943, when its cooking tanks exploded. The roof on the home of Harold and Genevieve Ord caught fire from drifting cinders. Ord was away from home, fighting the Cafe-Pavilion fire. A pier was constructed about 1909. Its original purpose was to generate electricity for the town using wave action which activated massive machinery on the end of the pier. It worked inadequately for its intended purpose and the "Edwards Wave Motor," as it was named, was disassembled and removed. For many years the pier attracted large crowds as did the nearby boardwalk and bathhouse. The wooden pier finally deteriorated and it washed to sea in a severe 1948 storm. The boardwalk lasted until 1953. Also in 1910, the builder of the Hotel del Coronado, E. S. Babcock, who reportedly kept a mistress in Imperial Beach, dredged a channel to where the north end of 10th Street is today. Boats carrying up to fifty passengers landed at what was called the South San Diego Landing. The boats were operated by Oakley Hall and Ralph Chandler. Captain A. J. Larsen piloted the Grant, which had been purchased from the USS Grant hotel by Chandler. The Grant traveled between Market Street in San Diego to the South Bay Landing three times a day. Sometimes a night trip was added. A battery powered trolley car operated by the Mexico and San Diego Railway Company met the people at the South Bay Landing. The trolley took them up 10th Street to Palm Ave. and then west on Palm to First Street where it turned left and proceeded to the end of the street before returning to the landing. The motor cars' batteries were the newest invention of Thomas A. Edison who had experimented with a way to do away with the overhead trolley car wires. The cruises were very popular for about six years. In January 1916, after very heavy rains, the the Sweetwater Dam suffered severe erosion, and the Lower Otay Dam was totally destroyed. A large wall of water