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Village Of Elmsford

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15 S Stone Ave, Elmsford, NY 10523
http://www.elmsfordny.org
(914) 592-6555
 
Elmsford was known as Storm's Bridge in the early 1700's and as Hall's Corners during the middle of the nineteenth century. One-mile square, it is midway between White Plains and Tarrytown. Its present name - adopted in 1870 - was inspired by a mammot...read more
Elmsford was known as Storm's Bridge in the early 1700's and as Hall's Corners during the middle of the nineteenth century. One-mile square, it is midway between White Plains and Tarrytown. Its present name - adopted in 1870 - was inspired by a mammoth elm tree, nearly thirty feet in circumference, which had been a landmark since revolutionary daysIn Elmsford's central square was a tavern, built in the early 1700's by Abraham Storm, and known later as O'Brien's Chateau. During the Revolutionary War, French and Colonial officers often gathered in this tavern and the barmaid, Betsy, frequently garnished their drinks with the tail feathers of chickens appropriated by the Colonials from Torie's hen-coops in the neighborhood. Thus Elmsford became the birthplace of that celebrated libation, "the cocktail." The tavern was also the scene of the escape of Harvey Birch, famous American spy, as related by James Fenimore Cooper in "The Spy." In his writings Cooper also mentioned another historical place in Elmsford, "Katy's Cave, " where American soldiers were hidden during the Revolution. Through the greater part of the 1800's Elmsford grew very slowly. It was just a little hamlet with a church, a school and a store, surrounded by outlying farms. Then in the last decades of the century the railroad followed the river northward and established a station there. This meant that people who worked in New York City could now live in Elmsford. The village experienced a population explosion which culminated in its incorporation in 1910. The easy accessibility of the community has contributed greatly to the industrial and commercial position of the village. One of the first radio stations in the county and perhaps the state, WRW began operation in Tarrytown in 1920 by an Elmsford resident. Descendants of Alexander Hamilton and Isaac Van Wart have resided in Elmsford. Van Wart, one of the captors of Major John Andre, during the Revolution, is buried in the cemetery of the Elmsford Reformed Church.
 
 

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Elmsford was known as Storm's Bridge in the early 1700's and as Hall's Corners during the middle of the nineteenth century. One-mile square, it is midway between White Plains and Tarrytown. Its present name - adopted in 1870 - was inspired by a mammoth elm tree, nearly thirty feet in circumference, which had been a landmark since revolutionary daysIn Elmsford's central square was a tavern, built in the early 1700's by Abraham Storm, and known later as O'Brien's Chateau. During the Revolutionary War, French and Colonial officers often gathered in this tavern and the barmaid, Betsy, frequently garnished their drinks with the tail feathers of chickens appropriated by the Colonials from Torie's hen-coops in the neighborhood. Thus Elmsford became the birthplace of that celebrated libation, "the cocktail." The tavern was also the scene of the escape of Harvey Birch, famous American spy, as related by James Fenimore Cooper in "The Spy." In his writings Cooper also mentioned another historical place in Elmsford, "Katy's Cave, " where American soldiers were hidden during the Revolution. Through the greater part of the 1800's Elmsford grew very slowly. It was just a little hamlet with a church, a school and a store, surrounded by outlying farms. Then in the last decades of the century the railroad followed the river northward and established a station there. This meant that people who worked in New York City could now live in Elmsford. The village experienced a population explosion which culminated in its incorporation in 1910. The easy accessibility of the community has contributed greatly to the industrial and commercial position of the village. One of the first radio stations in the county and perhaps the state, WRW began operation in Tarrytown in 1920 by an Elmsford resident. Descendants of Alexander Hamilton and Isaac Van Wart have resided in Elmsford. Van Wart, one of the captors of Major John Andre, during the Revolution, is buried in the cemetery of the Elmsford Reformed Church.