< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

Du Quoin Public Library

Not Rated Not Rated

28 S Washington St, Du Quoin, IL 62832
http://www.dpl.lib.il.us
(618) 542-5045
 
History: In 1934, the Junior Women's Club, not the Thursday club, Decided the city of Du Quoin needed a public library. The Club asked for donations and the community responded. A small building on North Mulberry Street (Artcraft Press), was donated b...read more
History: In 1934, the Junior Women's Club, not the Thursday club, Decided the city of Du Quoin needed a public library. The Club asked for donations and the community responded. A small building on North Mulberry Street (Artcraft Press), was donated by Mr. John Yehling. The Chamber of Commerce was responsible for the lighting of the library and Mr. La Fae Bradley gave freely of his time in the construction of the shelves for the reading room. On opening day, July 2, 1934, approximately 1,000 books were donated by the residents of Du Quoin. Although the Junior Women's Club was the principal sponsor of this project, an advisory board of three local businessmen was selected, and they were Joe Strickler, Harry Lancaster, and V. G. Croessman. Mrs. Allean Beem was the first librarian. Even though WPA assistance was given, it was still and expensive project for the members of the Junior Women's Club, so they asked other organizations to assist, and they formed a new library board composed of a representative form each club. That board in 1940, appealed to the city council for public support in the form of tax funds. The request was granted and the Du Quoin Public Library was reorganized according to the State Constitution. The first Board of Directors to administer tax funds was composted of Florence Baird, Rosamond Forester, Arline Yehling, Catherine Parks, Leah Hayes, Camille Karraker, Bertha Carr, Anton Berg, and Lapur Horn. On July 5, 1940, with the increase of the book collection, (4,000) a larger building was needed. The library was moved to the Gill building at the intersection of Poplar and Mulberry Streets. Following the death of Mrs. Chesney in 1946, Mrs. Dorothy Pritchett became librarian for the next four years, resigning in September, 1950. Upon her resignation, Mrs. Ann Richardson was appointed librarian and filled the position until her death March 12, 1967. Mrs. Lillian Swayer was then appointed and served as librarian until her illness in January, 1975. In March 1953, since the library was still growing, it was moved to the Ray Provart building on South Division Street, (now Linzee Insurance). At this time the library had 6,326 volumes and 3,450 patrons. In the fall of 1956, when the General Telephone Company occupied its new dial exchange on East Park Street, the firm, under the urging of manager Frank Simons of Du Quoin, offered its evacuated building to the city for $8,000, providing it be used for a library. The city accepted the offer and with the assistance of the Lions Club Members, the library was moved to 6 S. Washington Street. In July 1990, the Library moved in the new City Complex building, 28 South Washington Street, Du Quoin, Illinois.
 
 

Business Details

Category

(Edit)
Libraries
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 
Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

History: In 1934, the Junior Women's Club, not the Thursday club, Decided the city of Du Quoin needed a public library. The Club asked for donations and the community responded. A small building on North Mulberry Street (Artcraft Press), was donated by Mr. John Yehling. The Chamber of Commerce was responsible for the lighting of the library and Mr. La Fae Bradley gave freely of his time in the construction of the shelves for the reading room. On opening day, July 2, 1934, approximately 1,000 books were donated by the residents of Du Quoin. Although the Junior Women's Club was the principal sponsor of this project, an advisory board of three local businessmen was selected, and they were Joe Strickler, Harry Lancaster, and V. G. Croessman. Mrs. Allean Beem was the first librarian. Even though WPA assistance was given, it was still and expensive project for the members of the Junior Women's Club, so they asked other organizations to assist, and they formed a new library board composed of a representative form each club. That board in 1940, appealed to the city council for public support in the form of tax funds. The request was granted and the Du Quoin Public Library was reorganized according to the State Constitution. The first Board of Directors to administer tax funds was composted of Florence Baird, Rosamond Forester, Arline Yehling, Catherine Parks, Leah Hayes, Camille Karraker, Bertha Carr, Anton Berg, and Lapur Horn. On July 5, 1940, with the increase of the book collection, (4,000) a larger building was needed. The library was moved to the Gill building at the intersection of Poplar and Mulberry Streets. Following the death of Mrs. Chesney in 1946, Mrs. Dorothy Pritchett became librarian for the next four years, resigning in September, 1950. Upon her resignation, Mrs. Ann Richardson was appointed librarian and filled the position until her death March 12, 1967. Mrs. Lillian Swayer was then appointed and served as librarian until her illness in January, 1975. In March 1953, since the library was still growing, it was moved to the Ray Provart building on South Division Street, (now Linzee Insurance). At this time the library had 6,326 volumes and 3,450 patrons. In the fall of 1956, when the General Telephone Company occupied its new dial exchange on East Park Street, the firm, under the urging of manager Frank Simons of Du Quoin, offered its evacuated building to the city for $8,000, providing it be used for a library. The city accepted the offer and with the assistance of the Lions Club Members, the library was moved to 6 S. Washington Street. In July 1990, the Library moved in the new City Complex building, 28 South Washington Street, Du Quoin, Illinois.