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Wyoming State Fair

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400 West Center, Douglas, WY 82633
http://www.wystatefair.com
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(307) 358-2398 Additional Contacts
 
History:To really appreciate the history of the Wyoming State Fair, one needs to take a trip through the Pioneer museum located on the fairgrounds, dig through the files at the library, and more importantly, visit with the Old Timers. These State Fair...read more
History:To really appreciate the history of the Wyoming State Fair, one needs to take a trip through the Pioneer museum located on the fairgrounds, dig through the files at the library, and more importantly, visit with the Old Timers. These State Fair pioneers will tell you some of the most wonderful stories surrounding the events and the years at the Fair with a warmth and feeling lost in printed words.The Wyoming State Fair had its roots back as early as 1886 in an event called the First Annual Wyoming Territorial Fair conducted by the Board of Trustees of the Wyoming Fair Association. The original 80 acre site is lost to history but was somewhere along the old Cheyenne and Northern Railroad right-of-way, near Cheyenne. This must have continued for at least 4 years as there is mention of this event taking place as late as 1890. In 1901, the Wyoming Industrial Convention was held in Laramie. Then it was on to Sheridan and finally to a very lavish show in Casper in 1904. The 1904 show ended with a resolution for the establishment of a permanent fair. After several political battles, Douglas won the nomination with the passage of a bill in the 1905 Legislative session and an appropriation of $10,000 for the two-year period.With the $10,000, the Fair had to secure land, erect buildings and pay premiums and other expenses. The people of Douglas guaranteed the Fair and with this, plans for the 1905 Fair began. Nearly all of the $10,000 was used in the preliminary work and it was necessary for the people of Douglas to subscribe the money necessary for the running of the State Fair. A race track costing $5,000 and billed as the Best Track in the State, a modest grandstand and an Art Hall were built. The merchants of Douglas donated $3,000, enough money to begin building the Agriculture Hall, which was finished in 1913 and is still in use today as the Administration Building and Directors Office. The Midwest Review in 1925, published by the Midwest Refining company, stated that $40,000 was appropriated for the operation of the Fair on a two-year basis but This will not be ample to provide for any new buildings which are sadly needed because the Fair is growing to greater proportions. By 1925, the Ag Hall had been erected, the Art Hall enlarged and remodeled and the wooden grandstand replaced by a steel grandstand. An exhibit pavilion for horses, cattle and sheep had been built. It was equipped to care for the wants and needs of the exhibitor in a much better manner than the first Fair. The early camp at the Fair consisted of tents set up military style, with a military call to rise and sleep with the raising and lowering of the flag.
 
 

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History:To really appreciate the history of the Wyoming State Fair, one needs to take a trip through the Pioneer museum located on the fairgrounds, dig through the files at the library, and more importantly, visit with the Old Timers. These State Fair pioneers will tell you some of the most wonderful stories surrounding the events and the years at the Fair with a warmth and feeling lost in printed words.The Wyoming State Fair had its roots back as early as 1886 in an event called the First Annual Wyoming Territorial Fair conducted by the Board of Trustees of the Wyoming Fair Association. The original 80 acre site is lost to history but was somewhere along the old Cheyenne and Northern Railroad right-of-way, near Cheyenne. This must have continued for at least 4 years as there is mention of this event taking place as late as 1890. In 1901, the Wyoming Industrial Convention was held in Laramie. Then it was on to Sheridan and finally to a very lavish show in Casper in 1904. The 1904 show ended with a resolution for the establishment of a permanent fair. After several political battles, Douglas won the nomination with the passage of a bill in the 1905 Legislative session and an appropriation of $10,000 for the two-year period.With the $10,000, the Fair had to secure land, erect buildings and pay premiums and other expenses. The people of Douglas guaranteed the Fair and with this, plans for the 1905 Fair began. Nearly all of the $10,000 was used in the preliminary work and it was necessary for the people of Douglas to subscribe the money necessary for the running of the State Fair. A race track costing $5,000 and billed as the Best Track in the State, a modest grandstand and an Art Hall were built. The merchants of Douglas donated $3,000, enough money to begin building the Agriculture Hall, which was finished in 1913 and is still in use today as the Administration Building and Directors Office. The Midwest Review in 1925, published by the Midwest Refining company, stated that $40,000 was appropriated for the operation of the Fair on a two-year basis but This will not be ample to provide for any new buildings which are sadly needed because the Fair is growing to greater proportions. By 1925, the Ag Hall had been erected, the Art Hall enlarged and remodeled and the wooden grandstand replaced by a steel grandstand. An exhibit pavilion for horses, cattle and sheep had been built. It was equipped to care for the wants and needs of the exhibitor in a much better manner than the first Fair. The early camp at the Fair consisted of tents set up military style, with a military call to rise and sleep with the raising and lowering of the flag.