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City Of Coweta - City Hall

1 of 5 stars 2 Reviews

114 S Broadway, Coweta, OK 74429
(918) 486-2189
 
History of Coweta : "On an elevated, undulating prairie, at an altitude of about 800 feet above sea level in the choicest part of the Creek Nation lies the prosperous, attractive town of Coweta . . . such is the location of this live town. A happier,...read more
History of Coweta : "On an elevated, undulating prairie, at an altitude of about 800 feet above sea level in the choicest part of the Creek Nation lies the prosperous, attractive town of Coweta . . . such is the location of this live town. A happier, a more fortunate choice for a town location could not have been made." This quote was taken from Cowetas first newspaper, The Courier, in about 1903. But, that "fortunate choice for a town" was made about 80 years earlier, during the Removal of the Five Civilized Tribes from the Eastern United States to the to the "West" or Oklahoma as it is called today. In 1827, William McIntosh, along with Creeks from Coweta, Broken Arrow, Lochapoka and Big Spring arrived at the "Three Forks" of the Arkansas, Verdigris and Grand Rivers. By 1839-40, these settlers had spread northward along the Arkansas River where Coweta, Broken Arrow and Tulsa are today. In 1843, white missionaries arrived in Coweta to teach the Indian children. Reverend Robert Loughridge and his wife, Olivia, bought an empty cabin for ten dollars and began teaching. He named the mission "Koweta". Olivia and her child are buried in the Bruner Family Cemetery on the Hopping Farm a mile and a half southeast of Coweta. During the Civil War, the mission was abandoned. In 1867, the Creeks adopted a constitution which divided their nation into six districts. The Coweta district was comprised of Creek land northeast of the Arkansas River which included Tulsa. The political center of the Coweta district was a one-room long courthouse built on the banks of the Coweta Creek. This was about one fourth mile west of downtown Coweta. The Dawes Commission, appointed by the United States Congress, negotiated the allotment of tribal lands in 1898. At this time, the Creek courts jurisdiction was given to the Federal government. In 1903, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas railroad built a line from Tulsa to Muskogee with Coweta as a stop. This was the beginning of Cowetas major growth. The first newspaper began publication, a telephone line was installed, and s school was built. The discovery of oil and statehood brought more white settlers to Coweta. There were doctors, lawyers, dentists, carpenters, farmers, innkeepers, teachers, bankers, blacksmiths, realtors, barbers, bankers, along with an undertaker and photographer. Most of these professions and trades are still carried on today . . . only the faces have changes. -by Robyn Dill.
 
 

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1 of 5 stars
Aug 30, 2012
by anonymous
business
City Of Coweta - City Hall 114 S Broadway,
Coweta, OK 74429
USA
I think it is unforgivable what you are doing to Randy Woodward, they were just trying to save the house and that Mr. Long was a firefighter. I think your actions reflect that you are a backward petty little town with uneducated people in charge. I... (More)
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1 of 5 stars
Aug 30, 2012
by anonymous
business
City Of Coweta - City Hall 114 S Broadway,
Coweta, OK 74429
USA
I think it is unforgivable what you are doing to Randy Woodward, they were just trying to save the house and that Mr. Long was a firefighter. I think your actions reflect that you are a backward petty little town with uneducated people in charge. I... (More)
Was this Review helpful to you?   Yes No   

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History of Coweta : "On an elevated, undulating prairie, at an altitude of about 800 feet above sea level in the choicest part of the Creek Nation lies the prosperous, attractive town of Coweta . . . such is the location of this live town. A happier, a more fortunate choice for a town location could not have been made." This quote was taken from Cowetas first newspaper, The Courier, in about 1903. But, that "fortunate choice for a town" was made about 80 years earlier, during the Removal of the Five Civilized Tribes from the Eastern United States to the to the "West" or Oklahoma as it is called today. In 1827, William McIntosh, along with Creeks from Coweta, Broken Arrow, Lochapoka and Big Spring arrived at the "Three Forks" of the Arkansas, Verdigris and Grand Rivers. By 1839-40, these settlers had spread northward along the Arkansas River where Coweta, Broken Arrow and Tulsa are today. In 1843, white missionaries arrived in Coweta to teach the Indian children. Reverend Robert Loughridge and his wife, Olivia, bought an empty cabin for ten dollars and began teaching. He named the mission "Koweta". Olivia and her child are buried in the Bruner Family Cemetery on the Hopping Farm a mile and a half southeast of Coweta. During the Civil War, the mission was abandoned. In 1867, the Creeks adopted a constitution which divided their nation into six districts. The Coweta district was comprised of Creek land northeast of the Arkansas River which included Tulsa. The political center of the Coweta district was a one-room long courthouse built on the banks of the Coweta Creek. This was about one fourth mile west of downtown Coweta. The Dawes Commission, appointed by the United States Congress, negotiated the allotment of tribal lands in 1898. At this time, the Creek courts jurisdiction was given to the Federal government. In 1903, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas railroad built a line from Tulsa to Muskogee with Coweta as a stop. This was the beginning of Cowetas major growth. The first newspaper began publication, a telephone line was installed, and s school was built. The discovery of oil and statehood brought more white settlers to Coweta. There were doctors, lawyers, dentists, carpenters, farmers, innkeepers, teachers, bankers, blacksmiths, realtors, barbers, bankers, along with an undertaker and photographer. Most of these professions and trades are still carried on today . . . only the faces have changes. -by Robyn Dill.