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Village Of Golf Manor

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6450 Wiehe Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45237
http://www.golfmanor.org
(911) 531-7491
 
History: During the 1800's, Golf Manor was an oasis of farms and green, grazing lands. The people were as industrious and frugal as Pennsylvania Dutch. They had the drive to work dawn to dusk in their fields and barns. When winter came, they repaired...read more
History: During the 1800's, Golf Manor was an oasis of farms and green, grazing lands. The people were as industrious and frugal as Pennsylvania Dutch. They had the drive to work dawn to dusk in their fields and barns. When winter came, they repaired their tools, mended fences, and tended stock. They worshipped at local churches, even founded one in 1876: St. Peter's Evangelical Church of Pleasant Ridge. Among the founders were the family names of Stover, Kellermann, Wiehe, and Green. All had farms in the area now part of Golf Manor, though at that time, it was simply rural Columbia Township. Many of the streets are named for pioneer residents. Englewood recalls the log cabin on Losantiville with its undisciplined flower garden, berry patches, and Paw Paw and Quince trees. This was the home of Katy, Henry, and Joe Engle. Stover recalls the immense dairy started by Dietrich and Anna Theile Stover. Kellermann recalls the many Kellermann families who peopled the area descendants of William, Dietrich, and Gus Kellermann. Wiehe Road recalls the old three-story brick house atop Wiehe hill, which is still standing today. Visible as far away as the North Bend Road summit, it belonged to the Wiehe family well over a century ago, and in 1910 became the home of the Pieper family (the family now lives on Elbrook). The Powell family today owns the home. Hammel Avenue was named for Samuel Hammel, a well-known Cincinnati lawyer who once owned the largest single block of land in the area. Sam was a regular visitor at the Wiehe Road gardens. He came for fresh vegetables. Other influential people who came to the local gardens for vegetables were the Seasongoods, Tudors, Whites, and Cadwalladers. While most Golf Manor streets bear German names, the others have English or colonial flavor: Ardmore, Fair Oaks, Mayflower, and St. Albans. Early residents of the area had to walk to Pleasant Ridge to get the black interurban streetcar for downtown Cincinnati. The people living on the Western side walked to Ross and Montgomery in Norwood for the North Norwood streetcar. Children attended the turreted grade school on Montgomery Road (Pleasant Ridge Elementary School), opposite historic Pleasant Ridge Presbyterian Church. In 1909, the new red brick building with the massive concrete pillars was opened. The turreted school came down and the final section of the new school came into use in 1932. Pupils marched in and out of class to Sousa music via records on the wind-up Victrola operated by Principal Thomas Simmermon. There was no lunchroom in the school, but Miss Ross had a busy dining room and candy store across the street. Until 1920, Pleasant Ridge had a classical high school. In 1921, East Side High School opened in Hyde Park. Students and faculty from the Ridge were transferred there. East Side was renamed Withrow in 1924. When Golf Manor was laid out in lots by developers Britton and Brown in the 1920's, there were mostly 150-foot plots with 35 to 50 foot frontages. These sold for $1 down and $1 weekly. Total cost of the lots was $600 to $1,000. During the Great Depression, these lots sold for $200 to $300. To buy a lot originally, you simply tore off the ticket tacked to the stake of the lot you wanted and took it with your $1 binder to the sales office. The sales office was the tailgate of a truck. Soon you received your nice blue deed to a home site in that charming little village-to-be of Golf Manor. In time, the pastures, the wild roses, and honeysuckle gave way to streets, entrances to which were graced by brick pillars with concrete urns of vines, petunias, and geraniums. One of the first clusters of houses sprung up near the Evers' gardens on Langdon Farm Road. Graceland soon became home to such early settlers as the Banzhafs, Woods, Webers, and Shroyers. Shroyers were round the corner on Langdon. Meantime, Keith Watcher, on Bremont, was watching a nucleus grown around his unique home - same for Bob Folzenlogen on Hammel. It wasn't long unti
 
 

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History: During the 1800's, Golf Manor was an oasis of farms and green, grazing lands. The people were as industrious and frugal as Pennsylvania Dutch. They had the drive to work dawn to dusk in their fields and barns. When winter came, they repaired their tools, mended fences, and tended stock. They worshipped at local churches, even founded one in 1876: St. Peter's Evangelical Church of Pleasant Ridge. Among the founders were the family names of Stover, Kellermann, Wiehe, and Green. All had farms in the area now part of Golf Manor, though at that time, it was simply rural Columbia Township. Many of the streets are named for pioneer residents. Englewood recalls the log cabin on Losantiville with its undisciplined flower garden, berry patches, and Paw Paw and Quince trees. This was the home of Katy, Henry, and Joe Engle. Stover recalls the immense dairy started by Dietrich and Anna Theile Stover. Kellermann recalls the many Kellermann families who peopled the area descendants of William, Dietrich, and Gus Kellermann. Wiehe Road recalls the old three-story brick house atop Wiehe hill, which is still standing today. Visible as far away as the North Bend Road summit, it belonged to the Wiehe family well over a century ago, and in 1910 became the home of the Pieper family (the family now lives on Elbrook). The Powell family today owns the home. Hammel Avenue was named for Samuel Hammel, a well-known Cincinnati lawyer who once owned the largest single block of land in the area. Sam was a regular visitor at the Wiehe Road gardens. He came for fresh vegetables. Other influential people who came to the local gardens for vegetables were the Seasongoods, Tudors, Whites, and Cadwalladers. While most Golf Manor streets bear German names, the others have English or colonial flavor: Ardmore, Fair Oaks, Mayflower, and St. Albans. Early residents of the area had to walk to Pleasant Ridge to get the black interurban streetcar for downtown Cincinnati. The people living on the Western side walked to Ross and Montgomery in Norwood for the North Norwood streetcar. Children attended the turreted grade school on Montgomery Road (Pleasant Ridge Elementary School), opposite historic Pleasant Ridge Presbyterian Church. In 1909, the new red brick building with the massive concrete pillars was opened. The turreted school came down and the final section of the new school came into use in 1932. Pupils marched in and out of class to Sousa music via records on the wind-up Victrola operated by Principal Thomas Simmermon. There was no lunchroom in the school, but Miss Ross had a busy dining room and candy store across the street. Until 1920, Pleasant Ridge had a classical high school. In 1921, East Side High School opened in Hyde Park. Students and faculty from the Ridge were transferred there. East Side was renamed Withrow in 1924. When Golf Manor was laid out in lots by developers Britton and Brown in the 1920's, there were mostly 150-foot plots with 35 to 50 foot frontages. These sold for $1 down and $1 weekly. Total cost of the lots was $600 to $1,000. During the Great Depression, these lots sold for $200 to $300. To buy a lot originally, you simply tore off the ticket tacked to the stake of the lot you wanted and took it with your $1 binder to the sales office. The sales office was the tailgate of a truck. Soon you received your nice blue deed to a home site in that charming little village-to-be of Golf Manor. In time, the pastures, the wild roses, and honeysuckle gave way to streets, entrances to which were graced by brick pillars with concrete urns of vines, petunias, and geraniums. One of the first clusters of houses sprung up near the Evers' gardens on Langdon Farm Road. Graceland soon became home to such early settlers as the Banzhafs, Woods, Webers, and Shroyers. Shroyers were round the corner on Langdon. Meantime, Keith Watcher, on Bremont, was watching a nucleus grown around his unique home - same for Bob Folzenlogen on Hammel. It wasn't long unti