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Town Of Buckfield

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34 Turner St, Buckfield, ME 04220
http://www.townofbuckfield.com
(207) 336-2521
 
History : In the autumn of 1776, according to tradition, a party of hunters from New Gloucester, Maine, consisting of Abijah and Nathaniel Buck, Thomas Allen and John Brown, with perhaps others, came into what is now the town of Buckfield, for the sec...read more
History : In the autumn of 1776, according to tradition, a party of hunters from New Gloucester, Maine, consisting of Abijah and Nathaniel Buck, Thomas Allen and John Brown, with perhaps others, came into what is now the town of Buckfield, for the secondary purpose of procuring game, in which the region abounded, but primarily to select lots for a permanent settlement. They, or a part of them, had been here before on hunting expeditions, and had ascertained that it was a goodly land fit for habitation and had determined to settle here. Long before this, Streaked Mountain, Twenty-Mile River and even Bog Brook had received the names, by which, they have ever since been known. Hunters had found the bears and catamounts were numerous around Streaked Mountain and Owl's Head, that Twenty-Mile river and South pond were full of fish, while Bog Brook was noted for its beaver. The leader and moving spirit was Abijah Buck, then about thirty-four years old. He had served in the Colonial forces during the greater part of the year 1760 the year after Quebec had fallen. He had previously been a "Scout to the Eastward." From North Yarmouth he entered the service, and it was stated in his enlistment papers that he was born at Dunstable, Mass., age 17 and that his father's name was John Buck. His early education could not have been of the best, but he has acquired a large store of what may be termed practical knowledge. He wrote a fair hand for those times. His address was pleasing and his ways such as to win the confidence of those he approached. No man of the early period in the town's history was abler or of more integrity, and the most difficult undertakings requiring great tact and good judgment were given over to him to manage. He was the second person after the town was incorporated, to be commissioned as a Justice of the Peace, and was ever afterwards called "Squire Buck," even in depositions and other legal documents. He was not much in town office, for the reason probably, that for a considerable time, there was a strong feeling among the town's people against the proprietors, conceiving that their interests must be antagonistic to the town's interest. He was, however, several times elected one of the board of selectmen and assessors. When Abijah Buck came into the township he was well-to-do. The price for which he sold his homestead in New Gloucester, shows him to be possessed of $1,000.00 and upwards in cash or currency a handsome property for persons in his station for those times, and demonstrates that poverty did not drive him into the wilderness to find a new home. Nathaniel Buck, born about 1750, was a younger brother of Abijah Buck. He was a man of great physical strength and endurance, and noted for being an expert hunter and skilled in wood craft. In after years he was called a "housewright" which occupation claimed nearly all his attention. He was an industrious and thrifty man and withal a good citizen. Thomas Allen was a deserter from the English Army on account of the Boston Massacre in 1770, in which he had participated, and his sympathy with Americans. He was born in Bolton, England, about 1732. Before attaining to his majority he had been apprenticed to a weaver. Allen appears to have been well educated and was a good penman, as his records as town clerk show. Being of an adventurous disposition, he had enlisted as a soldier to come to Massachusetts to keep the people of that colony in subjection. But he quickly caught the spirit of independence of the people, and when a favorable opportunity offered, he, with another British soldier, deserted. They were pursued, however, so hotly that they were forced to take refuge under a bridge, over which their pursuers galloped on horse back. No sooner had the sound of their horse's hoofs died away in the distance than Allen and his companion scrambled out and fled in the woods. It had been a most anxious period for them while under the bridge, for they realized, if captured, th
 
 

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History : In the autumn of 1776, according to tradition, a party of hunters from New Gloucester, Maine, consisting of Abijah and Nathaniel Buck, Thomas Allen and John Brown, with perhaps others, came into what is now the town of Buckfield, for the secondary purpose of procuring game, in which the region abounded, but primarily to select lots for a permanent settlement. They, or a part of them, had been here before on hunting expeditions, and had ascertained that it was a goodly land fit for habitation and had determined to settle here. Long before this, Streaked Mountain, Twenty-Mile River and even Bog Brook had received the names, by which, they have ever since been known. Hunters had found the bears and catamounts were numerous around Streaked Mountain and Owl's Head, that Twenty-Mile river and South pond were full of fish, while Bog Brook was noted for its beaver. The leader and moving spirit was Abijah Buck, then about thirty-four years old. He had served in the Colonial forces during the greater part of the year 1760 the year after Quebec had fallen. He had previously been a "Scout to the Eastward." From North Yarmouth he entered the service, and it was stated in his enlistment papers that he was born at Dunstable, Mass., age 17 and that his father's name was John Buck. His early education could not have been of the best, but he has acquired a large store of what may be termed practical knowledge. He wrote a fair hand for those times. His address was pleasing and his ways such as to win the confidence of those he approached. No man of the early period in the town's history was abler or of more integrity, and the most difficult undertakings requiring great tact and good judgment were given over to him to manage. He was the second person after the town was incorporated, to be commissioned as a Justice of the Peace, and was ever afterwards called "Squire Buck," even in depositions and other legal documents. He was not much in town office, for the reason probably, that for a considerable time, there was a strong feeling among the town's people against the proprietors, conceiving that their interests must be antagonistic to the town's interest. He was, however, several times elected one of the board of selectmen and assessors. When Abijah Buck came into the township he was well-to-do. The price for which he sold his homestead in New Gloucester, shows him to be possessed of $1,000.00 and upwards in cash or currency a handsome property for persons in his station for those times, and demonstrates that poverty did not drive him into the wilderness to find a new home. Nathaniel Buck, born about 1750, was a younger brother of Abijah Buck. He was a man of great physical strength and endurance, and noted for being an expert hunter and skilled in wood craft. In after years he was called a "housewright" which occupation claimed nearly all his attention. He was an industrious and thrifty man and withal a good citizen. Thomas Allen was a deserter from the English Army on account of the Boston Massacre in 1770, in which he had participated, and his sympathy with Americans. He was born in Bolton, England, about 1732. Before attaining to his majority he had been apprenticed to a weaver. Allen appears to have been well educated and was a good penman, as his records as town clerk show. Being of an adventurous disposition, he had enlisted as a soldier to come to Massachusetts to keep the people of that colony in subjection. But he quickly caught the spirit of independence of the people, and when a favorable opportunity offered, he, with another British soldier, deserted. They were pursued, however, so hotly that they were forced to take refuge under a bridge, over which their pursuers galloped on horse back. No sooner had the sound of their horse's hoofs died away in the distance than Allen and his companion scrambled out and fled in the woods. It had been a most anxious period for them while under the bridge, for they realized, if captured, th