< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

Barnstable County Fairgrounds

Not Rated Not Rated

Route 151, Bourne, MA 02532
http://www.barnstablecountyfair.org
Email this business
(508) 563-3200
 
The Barnstable County Agricultural Society held its first fair, consisting primarily of livestock and handicraft exhibits, in October of 1844 at the County Court House in Barnstable Village. By the late 1800's and early 1900's, the County Fair had bec...read more
The Barnstable County Agricultural Society held its first fair, consisting primarily of livestock and handicraft exhibits, in October of 1844 at the County Court House in Barnstable Village. By the late 1800's and early 1900's, the County Fair had become the most popular annual event on Cape Cod. Some of the attractions were Grange exhibits, trotting horses, sulky racing, vaudeville acts, motorcycle racing, livestock exhibits, horse and oxen drags, fireworks and food tents, featuring clam chowder, homemade doughnuts and pies, and coffee, sponsored by local organizations. The children's Day and the Salt Hay Stack at the East Sandwich Grange were annual favorites. Two of the most successful and colorful Fairs recorded during that period were the Fairs of 1899 and 1920. In 1899, vendors calling their wares, sideshow barkers announcing bizarre sights, and the merry-go-round weaving its melodic spell charmed approximately 12,000. All the exhibitors' stalls were full, with no less than 100 categories and more than 1,200 participants. $800 purses attracted much interest in the trotting races, and the Hyannis Band Concert drew a festive crowd. The biggest Cape Cod sports event of the times, the series finals and the championship baseball games, were among the special attractions. The Agricultural Ball was highlight, in the gaily-trimmed Exhibition Hall, where ladies and gentleman in evening finery danced to the music of Brigham's eight-piece band. History has it that the fair of 1920 was the most financially successful. The society erected a $2,500 poultry building and spent $1,500 on paint throughout the Fairgrounds. Everywhere, Fairgoers saw refreshment stands, vendors and gee-gawks. Baseball games and trotting races were still a big attraction, and no fair in the state could match the Cape Cod exhibits. As if exhausted by such grandness, each fair in the years following 1920 was less colorful, until the Barnstable County Agricultural Society declared in 1931 that it's 87th Fair would be its last. In 1932, the "40 and 8" of the American Legion attempted to continue the tradition. They were able to recreate many of the old-time fair features, but notably absent were the horse show, the dog show, the livestock and handiworks exhibits-all County Fair mainstays. An eclipse that year brought an estimated 100,000 cars to Cape Cod, however, gaining an unexpected boost to Fair attendance. In 1939, another attempt was made to revive the Fair, for a Tercentennial celebration. Mayor Dart from Barnstaple, England, presided over the event. In the years to follow, until World War II, the Fairgrounds were used for circuses and rodeos. In 1954, a committee of citizens interested in reestablishing the Barnstable County Fair met in April. They formed a corporation, and voted to hold the Fair for 3 days in mid August, this time in Marston's Mills. Roscoe Goddard, elected clerk of the Corporation, discovered that the ancient charter of the Barnstable County Agricultural Society was still in existence. The new group decided to resurrect it. Lt. Governor of Massachusetts Sumner J. Whitter was on hand to "Kick off" the new fair. It was a colorful event that Cape Cod residents and visitors welcomed. Thirty-four commercial exhibitors displayed their wares under a tent. Back again were the livestock exhibits, baseball games and band concerts. New attractions included a square dance exhibition, an aerial trapeze act, elephants and an auto show. A total amount of $200 in premiums was offered that year. The Fair was on its way to being back on its feet. It wasn't easy. In 1955, the second year of the revived Fair, a combination of the Polio scare and a hurricane wiped out the Fair. A Special Fair train from Boston to Cape Cod carried only two passengers. The Fair opened and closed the same day. The community, led by its most distinguished citizens, rallied with an outpouring of financial support to help the Society pay off the debts of a failed Fair. The experi
 
 

Business Details

Category

(Edit)
Carnivals
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 
Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

The Barnstable County Agricultural Society held its first fair, consisting primarily of livestock and handicraft exhibits, in October of 1844 at the County Court House in Barnstable Village. By the late 1800's and early 1900's, the County Fair had become the most popular annual event on Cape Cod. Some of the attractions were Grange exhibits, trotting horses, sulky racing, vaudeville acts, motorcycle racing, livestock exhibits, horse and oxen drags, fireworks and food tents, featuring clam chowder, homemade doughnuts and pies, and coffee, sponsored by local organizations. The children's Day and the Salt Hay Stack at the East Sandwich Grange were annual favorites. Two of the most successful and colorful Fairs recorded during that period were the Fairs of 1899 and 1920. In 1899, vendors calling their wares, sideshow barkers announcing bizarre sights, and the merry-go-round weaving its melodic spell charmed approximately 12,000. All the exhibitors' stalls were full, with no less than 100 categories and more than 1,200 participants. $800 purses attracted much interest in the trotting races, and the Hyannis Band Concert drew a festive crowd. The biggest Cape Cod sports event of the times, the series finals and the championship baseball games, were among the special attractions. The Agricultural Ball was highlight, in the gaily-trimmed Exhibition Hall, where ladies and gentleman in evening finery danced to the music of Brigham's eight-piece band. History has it that the fair of 1920 was the most financially successful. The society erected a $2,500 poultry building and spent $1,500 on paint throughout the Fairgrounds. Everywhere, Fairgoers saw refreshment stands, vendors and gee-gawks. Baseball games and trotting races were still a big attraction, and no fair in the state could match the Cape Cod exhibits. As if exhausted by such grandness, each fair in the years following 1920 was less colorful, until the Barnstable County Agricultural Society declared in 1931 that it's 87th Fair would be its last. In 1932, the "40 and 8" of the American Legion attempted to continue the tradition. They were able to recreate many of the old-time fair features, but notably absent were the horse show, the dog show, the livestock and handiworks exhibits-all County Fair mainstays. An eclipse that year brought an estimated 100,000 cars to Cape Cod, however, gaining an unexpected boost to Fair attendance. In 1939, another attempt was made to revive the Fair, for a Tercentennial celebration. Mayor Dart from Barnstaple, England, presided over the event. In the years to follow, until World War II, the Fairgrounds were used for circuses and rodeos. In 1954, a committee of citizens interested in reestablishing the Barnstable County Fair met in April. They formed a corporation, and voted to hold the Fair for 3 days in mid August, this time in Marston's Mills. Roscoe Goddard, elected clerk of the Corporation, discovered that the ancient charter of the Barnstable County Agricultural Society was still in existence. The new group decided to resurrect it. Lt. Governor of Massachusetts Sumner J. Whitter was on hand to "Kick off" the new fair. It was a colorful event that Cape Cod residents and visitors welcomed. Thirty-four commercial exhibitors displayed their wares under a tent. Back again were the livestock exhibits, baseball games and band concerts. New attractions included a square dance exhibition, an aerial trapeze act, elephants and an auto show. A total amount of $200 in premiums was offered that year. The Fair was on its way to being back on its feet. It wasn't easy. In 1955, the second year of the revived Fair, a combination of the Polio scare and a hurricane wiped out the Fair. A Special Fair train from Boston to Cape Cod carried only two passengers. The Fair opened and closed the same day. The community, led by its most distinguished citizens, rallied with an outpouring of financial support to help the Society pay off the debts of a failed Fair. The experi