< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

The City Of Atmore

Not Rated Not Rated

201 E Louisville Ave, Atmore, AL 36502
http://www.cityofatmore.com
(251) 368-2253
 
Long before settlers came to the area that is now Atmore, The Creek Indians inhabited the virgin forests of longleaf pines settling along the creeks and rivers. The development of this area began in the 1860's following the Civil War as the Mobile and...read more
Long before settlers came to the area that is now Atmore, The Creek Indians inhabited the virgin forests of longleaf pines settling along the creeks and rivers. The development of this area began in the 1860's following the Civil War as the Mobile and Great Northern railroad extended its line south to the Tensaw River near Mobile.Workers who moved through the area laying track for the railroad were drawn by the rich farmland and abundance of timber. Agriculture and timber are still major factors in Atmore's economy.The first structure in what is Atmore was a small shed built along the railroad at which supplies were left for William Larkin Williams who had a logging operation ten miles down in Florida. In 1866 the site was first called Williams Station, just a supply stop along the railroad.By the 1870's there were several buildings, a railroad station, a store containing the post office, and one dwelling. Late in 1870 the first sawmill was put into operation. However, it was the sawmill built by William Marshall Carney in 1876 that sparked the growth of the community. Recognizing the potential of this area which abounded in cypress ponds and virgin forests, legend says Carney hitched a mule to a boat and set claim to most of the area. Because of his many contributions to the growth of the community Mr. Carney is often called "the father of Atmore".By 1885 with a population of 195, Williams Station had enough residents to take an interest in politics. A polling place was provided and votes were cast in a county election.The W.M. Carney Mill Company was in full swing attracting settlers from Wilcox and Monroe counties who came to work in both the lumber and turpentine industries. During this time the social life of Atmore centered around it's early churches.As the community grew, several leading citizens advanced the argument that the name Williams Station was not suitable for a thriving municipality of two hotels and a few stores. Carney was the most popular name, but there was already a small village just west of the town named Carney. In 1897 the name was changed to Atmore in honor of C.P. Atmore, the General Ticket Agent on the Louisville Nashville Railroad which now stretched to Mobile.
 
 

Business Details

Additional Information

  • City, City Courts
 

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 

You Might Also Like

  • Total Attorneys - Personal Injury
  • Call today for an appointment
  • View Website

Search Nearby

Data provided by one or more of the following: Dex Media, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

Long before settlers came to the area that is now Atmore, The Creek Indians inhabited the virgin forests of longleaf pines settling along the creeks and rivers. The development of this area began in the 1860's following the Civil War as the Mobile and Great Northern railroad extended its line south to the Tensaw River near Mobile.Workers who moved through the area laying track for the railroad were drawn by the rich farmland and abundance of timber. Agriculture and timber are still major factors in Atmore's economy.The first structure in what is Atmore was a small shed built along the railroad at which supplies were left for William Larkin Williams who had a logging operation ten miles down in Florida. In 1866 the site was first called Williams Station, just a supply stop along the railroad.By the 1870's there were several buildings, a railroad station, a store containing the post office, and one dwelling. Late in 1870 the first sawmill was put into operation. However, it was the sawmill built by William Marshall Carney in 1876 that sparked the growth of the community. Recognizing the potential of this area which abounded in cypress ponds and virgin forests, legend says Carney hitched a mule to a boat and set claim to most of the area. Because of his many contributions to the growth of the community Mr. Carney is often called "the father of Atmore".By 1885 with a population of 195, Williams Station had enough residents to take an interest in politics. A polling place was provided and votes were cast in a county election.The W.M. Carney Mill Company was in full swing attracting settlers from Wilcox and Monroe counties who came to work in both the lumber and turpentine industries. During this time the social life of Atmore centered around it's early churches.As the community grew, several leading citizens advanced the argument that the name Williams Station was not suitable for a thriving municipality of two hotels and a few stores. Carney was the most popular name, but there was already a small village just west of the town named Carney. In 1897 the name was changed to Atmore in honor of C.P. Atmore, the General Ticket Agent on the Louisville Nashville Railroad which now stretched to Mobile.